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Thread: Coral ID

  1. #21
    Registered User Levi's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by bush8984 View Post
    Still a french model

    Post #12 contradicts ur link
    http://www.thescmas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16978
    LOL not sure why you insist on stating that because you have kept one alive for a few months at most, with the current setup of flow that this is how you should setup a seahorse tank? Most articles will state low flow and in actuality they can handle more flow because seahorses and pipefish do not lack the ability to swim, rather the stamina for sustained currents. If you are going to provide them with areas of moderate flow (5x-10x) as opposed to low flow (5x-6x) then make sure there are areas with "slack-water" as a retreat.

    The commonly held belief that a seahorse cannot tolerate any current is a misconception; a healthy horse can handle a strong flow if it has to. But please do not subject even healthy seahorses to strong water flow. The idea of watching seahorses zooming around your tank or surfing the current may be amusing, but this is not recommended for seahorses. Rather, a small powerhead near the bottom or back of the tank is enough to generate a gentle current that will eliminate dead zones and still not stress your seahorse.
    http://www.fishchannel.com/fish-heal...seahorses.aspx

    A seahorse tank must have gentle to moderate currents, with 3–5 times tank volume turned
    over per hour. A seahorse tank needs to be void of intense currents and requires
    lower flow areas where a seahorse can retreat and rest
    http://www.seahorse.org/library/arti.../careguide.pdf on page 2

    Seahorses require an aquarium with a low water flow and many places for them to wrap their tails around.
    Seahorses do not require special lighting systems, but they do benefit from proper filtration. Wet/dry filters and canister filters are ideal for seahorse aquariums.
    http://www.peteducation.com/article....+2204&aid=2786

    Water Circulation for the Seahorse Reef

    Many seahorse keepers are overly conscious of the inactive lifestyle and limited swimming ability of Hippocampus, and have adjusted their flow rates accordingly, resulting in tanks with too little water movement. Don’t make that mistake when setting up your seahorse reef. In actuality, seahorses prefer moderate water movement, including some areas of brisk current, providing there are also sheltered spots and some areas of relatively slack water they can move to when desired. Slack water means comparatively low flow, not stagnant conditions! As with any aquarium, avoid dead spots and stagnant areas in the seahorse tank at all costs.

    I have often discussed this matter with professional divers and collectors who regularly encounter seahorses in the ocean, and they report that the horses are frequently found where you would least expect them—well offshore, in relatively deep water, and thriving in areas with strong tides and powerful currents.

    My point is that as long as slack-water retreats are available, the greater seahorses can tolerate far more current than most folks suspect. What they lack as swimmers is not agility, but rather stamina. They can hold their own against strong currents, but not indefinitely, so low flow areas where they can move out of the current and hold when they want to rest must be provided in addition to good circulation.

    So does this mean the seahorse reef must be devoid of corals that do best in strong currents? No; it just means that the reefkeeper must be cognizant of the above and plan accordingly. When designing a reef tank that will include seahorses, one must anticipate the different ways they might be injured in such a setup and then take precautions to prevent them from coming to harm. The process of rendering your reef system seahorse safe is much like the measures new parents take to childproof their house. Intake tubes for the filters should be shielded, siphon tubes should be equipped with filter baskets or screens, and so on.

    For instance, when unpredictable surges and powerful water movement are combined with overflows, there is a risk that seahorses could become pinned against an overflow or even go over it. Therefore, in the seahorse reef, overflows must be baffled and/or screened off, or the water flow should be adjusted sufficiently to prevent that from happening.

    Likewise, although seahorses have no problem with strong currents in the wild, in the confines of aquarium it is possible for them to come in contact with stinging corals if they are struck by a sudden powerful wave or surge, or if they are overwhelmed by a strong, unexpected current. The hobbyist needs to take this into consideration when placing water returns and corals in the seahorse reef, particularly if species with powerful nematocysts—such as Euphyllia torch corals or Catalaphyllia elegant corals—will be part of the exhibit. If possible, keep the water currents steady and unvarying so the seahorses can establish holding areas in the sheltered spots and low-flow zones without getting blindsided by unpredictable currents.

    One good way to accommodate both the needs of corals that prefer powerful currents and the seahorse’s need for slack-water retreats is to create tall rock formations a foot or two down-current from the strongest water flows to intercept and deflect or divert that strong flow of water, thereby creating eddies and slack-water zones where there is relatively little water movement downstream. Seahorses will hold in these low-flow areas when they want to move away from the current, so it’s a good idea to position convenient hitching posts on the lee side of such formations.

    Another excellent way to accomplish the same thing is to use small powerheads to create and direct current wherever needed. A properly positioned powerhead can thus bathe your prized Acropora formations in a brisk water stream precisely, without generating too much water movement elsewhere in the aquarium. Just be aware that powerheads can become death traps for seahorses if their intakes are not properly shielded or screened off, and take the necessary precautions. Carefully conceal the intakes amidst the rockwork where they will be completely inaccessible to seahorses, or otherwise shield them, or screen them off with a coarse sponge prefilter.

    In short, if your filtration is not turning over the entire volume of the aquarium a minimum of five times per hour, your seahorse setup is undercirculated. A spray bar return positioned above the surface of the water to diffuse the outflow will allow you to achieve turnover rates of 10 or 20 times the total volume of the aquarium every hour without generating too much turbulence or current for seahorses. If you have seahorse-proofed your system properly, there’s really no such thing as too much water movement as long as your seahorses aren’t getting buffeted around by the currents, aren’t spilling eggs during the copulatory rise, and aren’t having difficulty targeting their prey and eating.
    http://www.tfhmagazine.com/details/a...campus-spp.htm

  2. #22
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    Just cause u read it from someone else makes it the truth and law.

    I have my truth and law here in person. Come check him out and tel me I'm lying

    I can post links to about the truth....And Internet readings


    http://youtu.be/v_CgPsGY5Mw
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    When all else fails, kick it, smack it then throw it out the wndow and start over

  3. #23
    Registered User Levi's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by bush8984 View Post
    Just cause u read it from someone else makes it the truth and law.

    I have my truth and law here in person. Come check him out and tel me I'm lying

    I can post links to about the truth....And Internet readings


    http://youtu.be/v_CgPsGY5Mw
    I don't give a **** what you do in your own tank honestly or Charles or anyone else. I'm not the seahorse police. Anyone considering a seahorse just do some research and decide how you want to provide a home for them.

  4. #24
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    Horsey 5 0

    Might wanna call this guy and report him lol

    http://youtu.be/3Q_KEDRA9ww
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    When all else fails, kick it, smack it then throw it out the wndow and start over

  5. #25
    Senior Member codeman01's Avatar

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    So.....about that carnation coral. Does light actually hurt NPS, or is light just not necessary?
    LEARNING SALTWATER ONE "CRASH" AT A TIME

  6. #26
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    For the majority of them it does heavy light does not hurt them however they will be healthier in as low as light as possible. Sand bed is normally ok

    sent from FBI van #43

  7. #27
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    It doesn't hurt them, certain ones do better in shaded areas but most can survive in full reef Lighting as long as water quality is maintained and tank is kept fed for it
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    When all else fails, kick it, smack it then throw it out the wndow and start over

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