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Thread: Culturing Copepods (The More Complicated Way)

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    Senior Member Amphispur's Avatar

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    Culturing Copepods (The More Complicated Way)

    Congratulations! You have (hopefully) gotten more experience with your copepods, and believe you are ready to keep more than your average species of copepod. I am not going to lie here, it will be one of the most frustrating times that you will go through in the beginning (I am still having problems, but I am working them out.) ONE REQUIREMENT FOR GOING INTO THIS ROUTE: You MUST be actively culturing LIVE ALGAE'S to keep the species I will be going over. To learn about how to keep live algae cultures, go to this link: http://www.thescmas.com/forums/showt...ng-Live-Algaes

    First off, time for a quick refresher in some terms. Demersal, means living at or close to the walls of the aquariums, does not swim in the open much. Pelagic, means free swimming. Some new terms for you, nauplii, means the "baby" form of a copepod. Larvae, means baby fish. Excellent, now that we have very quickly gone over the basics, time to go into what you came here for! CULTURING YOUR COPEPODS!!!

    Apocyclops panamensis
    Pelagic
    Not to easy to find, but is an excellent food for the larvae of fish.
    Parvocal**** crassirostris
    Very hard to keep
    Pelagic
    Easy to find, and excellent food for young fry, if they are small enough to eat the nauplii
    Raising and Care
    Use your basic 5g bucket copepod system (If you do not know what this is see this link: http://www.thescmas.com/forums/showt...(Easy-Version) )

    One difference with the A. panamensis is that they thrive with live Isochrysis galbana the best. Use the same basic ratio of your RG Complete as well here, as to provide more nutrition for your panamensis. When feeding your Iso to your apocyclops, I would recommend around 48.5 million cells of Isochrysis. "BUT WAIT! HOW ON EARTH DO I GET THAT AMOUNT OF ISO ZACH?!" is most likely what you are thinking at this moment. For that, we have the Florida Aqua Farms Microalgae Density Measurer, located here: http://florida-aqua-farms.com/shop/m...sity-measurer/ With the density stick, there is a conversion table to convert your algae species into millions of cells per ml. Also though, that number is not exactly correct. The number varies upon your density of apocyclops, how much they eat, etc. What you really want is to make the water a hint of yellow. If you wanted to get REALLY scientific, you could measure how much algae you are using, and calculate the amount of cells you are using. What you should not do is feed the live algae to the copepods every day. Feed it to them around once a week, or until you notice that hit of yellow has faded. I know I said that this was specifically for the A. panemensis pieces, but it is not only for them. This is the basic technique for almost any copepod you can manage to get your hands on. Some, require more algae species besides the iso and the RG. But for the most part, a beginner breeder would not need quite as hard copepods like the parvo.

    If you want to collect different stages in life of your copepods, whether it be to just examine them, or to feed them to larvae, you should have micron mesh handy. The sizes that you would best need would range from 40-220 microns, which you can buy off of amazon. To collect, grab an empty 5g bucket. Put the micron mesh over it (you can cut the mesh to make a sieve that fits around your bucket to help with the straining, or any sort of tool that helps gather the stage that you want) and send the copepods from the bucket that has your live pods into the straining bucket. I would recommend keeping the copepods under the water the entire time while doing this, thus why a sieve that runs all the way across the top of your sieving bucket might not work quite as well. Use a turkey baster and suck up the copepods you want, and send the rest into your brand new culture container.

    Now, although that this technique might seem like it is only for the harder copepods, and those are the ones that you should keep, WRONG. NEVER forget about the easy ones. They may be easy for a reason, but they are also beneficial to you. Live food for your tank or sometimes fry food!

    If you have any questions feel free to pm me on the site, I will usually answer within the hour.

    Amph
    Last edited by Amphispur; 01-14-2014 at 08:58 PM.
    Mad Science you say? I just call it Fish Breeding !


    Genuine Copepod Scientist!



  2. #2
    Senior Member Amphispur's Avatar

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    Also, if you need any help trying to get some species of copepods that you have a hard time finding on the market, send me a pm and I'll go through my contacts and see what I can find.
    Mad Science you say? I just call it Fish Breeding !


    Genuine Copepod Scientist!



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