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BRuby
03-22-2010, 11:08 PM
Marineland LED Double Bright Lighting System

LED Lighting Features:
•17,000 Lifetime Hours
•Slim stylized lighting profile
•Illuminated by energy efficient LED's (75 Lumens per 1 watt LED)
•(16) 1W Daylight LED's Totaling 1,200 Lumens
•(8) Lunar LED Lamps

I am going to buy a 57 gallon oceanic illuminata tank and want to have no limitations on corals. The tank dimensions 36wx18dx21h I think. I know nothing about LEDs. Is this anywhere near enough light? thanks in advance.

kmauger1
03-22-2010, 11:35 PM
Todd from Steel City Corals(a sponsor on the site) has an led fixture that has some pretty impressive par ratings. I would send him a message. His name on here is racer69

mrliriel
03-23-2010, 12:19 PM
The Marineland LED fixtures are not strong enough to support anything with high light requirements. There just isn't enough LEDs in them. You cold easily keep softies and LPS with them.

the grim reefer
03-23-2010, 01:45 PM
I don't even know if LPS would live under just 16 one watt LED's over a 58. Racers would be good for softies and LPS placed right.

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 04:15 PM
I don't even know if LPS would live under just 16 one watt LED's over a 58. Racers would be good for softies and LPS placed right.

Wattage is a power consumption value, not a lumen output figure. You can't judge any LED purely by the power consumption alone. A 1 watt LED can put out anywhere from ~1 lumen to 139 lumens (Cree XP-G) or more and still only use 1 watt. I can't find the lumen output of the one Racer69 sells, but these 1-watt LEDs are putting out 75 times the lumens of a regular 1-watt LED.

It might be a bit low over a 58g for SPS though.

mrliriel
03-23-2010, 04:20 PM
Wattage is a power consumption value, not a lumen output figure. You can't judge any LED purely by the power consumption alone. A 1 watt LED can put out anywhere from ~1 lumen to 139 lumens (Cree XP-G) or more and still only use 1 watt. I can't find the lumen output of the one Racer69 sells, but these 1-watt LEDs are putting out 75 times the lumens of a regular 1-watt LED.

It might be a bit low over a 58g for SPS though.

The fixture Todd sells has emitters that produce around 80 lumens per LED, however, there are 119 LEDs on it. The 80 lumen figure was attained by e-mailing the manufacture of them. Not the brightest emitter out there but for the price of the entire fixture and the number of emitters on it I think it is a value.

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 04:37 PM
That's quite a bit. Did they tell you the cone angle for each LED? The one I saw (same model as Todd's) looked pretty bright and focused. I see the designer said the PAR ratings are "projected numbers". I never saw a follow-up measurement that confirmed his projections in actual salt water: 2" depth - 1537 Par; 12" depth - 423 Par; 24" depth - 182 Par. Those would be great numbers.

mrliriel
03-23-2010, 04:51 PM
That's quite a bit. Did they tell you the cone angle for each LED? The one I saw (same model as Todd's) looked pretty bright and focused. I see the designer said the PAR ratings are "projected numbers". I never saw a follow-up measurement that confirmed his projections in actual salt water: 2" depth - 1537 Par; 12" depth - 423 Par; 24" depth - 182 Par. Those would be great numbers.

BridgeLux told me that they were NLX-5 emitters that the customer packaged. To know that you would have to contact the manufacturer of the fixture to find out. I only talked with the emitter producer.

mrliriel
03-23-2010, 04:55 PM
Here is a link to their white paper....
http://www.bridgelux.com/assets/products_portfolio/BXCB2424Datasheet111309.pdf
Looks like the radiation pattern is about 45 degrees.

Here is a snippet off their website about the emitter.

NLX-5 Power Chip Series
The NLX-5 is a high-power gallium nitride (GaN) LED chip series. The NLX-5, when embedded in a customer's standard, cool white LED package, provides a typical light output of 85-90 lumens (@350 mA). As a result, the NLX-5 delivers the industry's leading cost-per-lumen performance for warm white, cool white and RGB applications.

BRuby
03-23-2010, 04:58 PM
the reason I ask the question is that the fixture in question is $129.99. this seems like a great price for an LED fixture. I am also considering the deep sea aquatics 34 gal.

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 05:22 PM
BridgeLux told me that they were NLX-5 emitters that the customer packaged. To know that you would have to contact the manufacturer of the fixture to find out. I only talked with the emitter producer.

I meant someone here in CO.

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 05:29 PM
Hmm. With 139 lumen LEDs (also 350mA) currently available, "industry's leading cost-per-lumen performance" seems a bit dated.

Sorry we hijacked the thread, BRuby. Even at lower cost, the Marineland fixture would probably come up short for SPS, and probably most other corals.

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 05:35 PM
It's a little exciting to see such rapid development in LED technology. Between increase in per-chip output, and multi-chip emitters, we're going to see coral-blasting lighting that will cost a lot less to buy and operate dominating the market very soon.

I just want to get my DIY setup going.

BRuby
03-23-2010, 06:04 PM
thanks for the info snorkelbob. I ran vho's for years, now MH. Just thought an LED fixture would look cool over one of those tanks I mentioned. It sounds like I would need two of the fixtures Todd has for the 57 gal?

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 06:23 PM
Hard to say without getting actual PAR readings at full depth. The club has a PAR meter and I assume access to Todd's LEDs.

the grim reefer
03-23-2010, 08:15 PM
Wattage is a power consumption value, not a lumen output figure. You can't judge any LED purely by the power consumption alone. A 1 watt LED can put out anywhere from ~1 lumen to 139 lumens (Cree XP-G) or more and still only use 1 watt. I can't find the lumen output of the one Racer69 sells, but these 1-watt LEDs are putting out 75 times the lumens of a regular 1-watt LED.

It might be a bit low over a 58g for SPS though.

The Cree XPG is 3 watts not 1. BIG difference even between the XPG and the XR's which aint half bad are only 107 for the Q5's and we are still talking 3 watts as opposed to 1.

DARC Dave has 30 3 watt edisons over his nano, about 12 inches down he's getting a couple hundred PAR.

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 08:32 PM
3V x 350mA = 1.05W

You must be talking about max Vf (although I hear they're being recertified to run at 1.5A). I was talking nominal.

http://ledsupply.com/creexpg-w139.php

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 09:01 PM
But I'm wondering what happens to the color temp when you overdrive it. 6500K must be at nominal voltage/current.

SpaceOps
03-23-2010, 09:14 PM
Looking at the spec sheet, 100% luminous flux is achieved at 350mA, but increasing current to 1 amp yields 250% output, nearly 350 lumens! With optics, that's a massive amount of light from a single LED. I'm sure that will shorten the LED life, though.

SpaceOps
04-01-2010, 08:31 AM
Here's an update you may be interested in. Dr. Sanjay Joshi (lighting guru) has replaced the lighting over his 29G with an Eco-Lamps KR-92 fixture, and plans to replace his 2X150W Metal Halides on his 55G reef with a 4ft version of the fixture.

Here's the article where he evaluates them against MH and T5s: http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2010/2/aafeature2

mrliriel
04-01-2010, 10:40 AM
Where do they sell that fixture?

SpaceOps
04-01-2010, 10:56 AM
http://www.eco-sell.com/

A mere $1,811.16

Info at www.eco-lamps.com (http://www.eco-lamps.com).

mrliriel
04-01-2010, 12:03 PM
Wow, they think that thing is made from solid gold. I would have to get some specifics from the maker regaurding the emitters, and drivers in this fixture. Otherwise I am not sure that I could justify the cost.

SpaceOps
04-01-2010, 12:18 PM
Well, it did have a built-in timer. No fading capability that I could see.

I saw 7 white LEDs per cluster, and 8 clusters. Didn't count the blues.

Is it any wonder why people do DIY? I made my 3x250W MH fixture and ballasts by DIY and saved a fortune. Wait til I get around to the LEDs by DIY. The best part of DIY lighting is that you can change and expand it with little effort and cost. With the commercial stuff, you're pretty much stuck with what they come with.