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morrisjtja
02-08-2016, 03:59 AM
75 gallon with 60 pounds of sand and about 50 pounds of rock. The tank and stand alone weigh 100 if not more. Should the floor be able to support close to 1000 pounds? The tank is sitting on an exterior wall but the joists are running parallel with the tank not perpendicular. http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160208/4c441e6570262dde653ee51db220048f.jpg

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morrisjtja
02-08-2016, 04:07 AM
This is what it looks like under the floor http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160208/8905a964227986a8563f4b7fa437807b.jpg

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esmith
02-09-2016, 09:59 AM
How far apart are those joists? They look pretty close together actually, so I'd assume you're fine unless you see bowing/flexing under there.

static reef
02-09-2016, 11:22 AM
75 gallon with 60 pounds of sand and about 50 pounds of rock. The tank and stand alone weigh 100 if not more. Should the floor be able to support close to 1000 pounds? The tank is sitting on an exterior wall but the joists are running parallel with the tank not perpendicular. http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160208/4c441e6570262dde653ee51db220048f.jpg

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75 gallons - rock and sand size=65 gallons

65 gallons= 520lbs + 110lbs of rock and sand= 630lbs + 250 (max) in tank, stand, canopy, and sump = 880lbs

880lbs / 6 sq ft of floor that the tank is spread over (if this tank is 4' w x 18" d) = 146lbs per sq ft.

146 lbs per sq ft is nothing for a newer model home. If you place the stand on a 3/4" plywood slab it will help disburse the weight over the 6 sq ft of used flooring as well.

Your floor joists look like they are spread at 16" on center which means that the back edge of your tank will be resting next to the wall which is the strongest part of your floor. The front edge of your tank will be resting on top of the 1st floor joist which is 10x stronger than the plywood that they laid for your sub flooring.

I think that you will be fine.

morrisjtja
02-09-2016, 09:15 PM
Would it be ok where it sits now or should be move it so the joists go perpendicular to the tank?

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static reef
02-09-2016, 11:12 PM
Perpendicular is stronger, but not necessary in the case of a 75 gallon I believe.

Manchestercity
02-10-2016, 01:55 PM
Building code requires all homes be built to support 250 lbs of live weight per square foot. You'll be fine.

esmith
02-10-2016, 04:04 PM
dupe.

esmith
02-10-2016, 04:05 PM
Building code requires all homes be built to support 250 lbs of live weight per square foot. You'll be fine.

This would be considered dead load, not live load wouldn't it? But I didn't see what the requirements were for dead load anywhere in a quick skim of residential code.

Manchestercity
02-10-2016, 04:07 PM
This would be considered dead load, not live load wouldn't it? But I didn't see what the requirements were for dead load anywhere in a quick skim of residential code.

No dead load is the house itself. So the weight of the flooring. All furniture and people are considered live load.

Manchestercity
02-10-2016, 04:09 PM
I can bust out my old structural charts and see what the exact weight is. But I just remember live load is around 250 lbs per sq. ft

Larrypueblo
02-10-2016, 05:21 PM
don't think you'll have a problem I had a 200 gallon reef with a 50 gallon sump and a ton of rock and sand in a 1973 piece of crap mobile home. you should be good.

esmith
02-11-2016, 10:27 AM
Ah, good to know! Learn something new every day.

morrisjtja
02-12-2016, 12:51 AM
Thanks everyone, I put water back in the tank tonight. With all the live rock and sand I have, what do you think I will be looking at for cycle time? I added a big raw shrimp to the tank to help it along.

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lsaint
02-12-2016, 09:05 AM
Depends but dont rush this is where i see a ton of people make there first big mistake

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hooked
02-12-2016, 09:39 AM
Depends but dont rush this is where i see a ton of people make there first big mistake

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+1. agree!

static reef
02-12-2016, 09:55 AM
Typically your swings will be done in about 3 weeks, but I also agree with Lenny and Doyle. Take your time and give your self a few extra weeks for your tank to start stabilizing.

Take that time to research your way ahead.

6 months is normally the time that we see an actual change in the stability of a new system. I strongly recommend that you not put anything expensive or hard to take care of until then.