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duprst
04-22-2015, 10:22 AM
What do I need to help clean the algae off my sand bed? My tank has gone through a cycle and now I have algae on my rocks, sand bed and some on the glass. The rocks and glass are doing better with my lawmower blenny and snails but nothing seems to be getting the algae on the sand bed and it is driving me crazy.

sweat044
04-22-2015, 10:25 AM
Do you have a picture of the algae? It could be cyano. A picture would help a lot.

NightStar
04-22-2015, 10:32 AM
+1 on the picture. Also, unfortunately algae is quite often just a part of the cycle. The tail end, yes, and safe to put things in your tank, but still a part of the cycle. A sand sifting sea cucumber works great for keeping a sand bed clean. If it's thick cyano, you can quite often just pick it up manually until it goes away.

Coral Xpressions
04-22-2015, 12:58 PM
You'll want to look at the actual problem which is nitrates and phosphates. Look at ways to increase exportation and limit adding. If you feed frozen, rinse you food first to remove alot of the phosphates that are added that way. Add a filter sock to your drain lines if you have a sump or fuge and aren't using one already. If you have filter floss of any kind anywhere in the system be sure to keep those clean at all times to prevent them from producing excess nitrates. Increase intensity of lighting on cheato and it'll grow quicker and thus remove more. Few things to look at. Once you get those figured out then the algea will be naturally eliminated by cuc and other gazers.

You might also look at your lighting. T5 and halide bulbs will start adding to the problem of algea growth as they get older and start slipping out of spectrum.

Rich
04-23-2015, 07:59 AM
What do I need to help clean the algae off my sand bed? My tank has gone through a cycle and now I have algae on my rocks, sand bed and some on the glass. The rocks and glass are doing better with my lawmower blenny and snails but nothing seems to be getting the algae on the sand bed and it is driving me crazy.

I use a pair of long tweezers to grab it and just pull it up. It's very time consuming... You can also syphon it out when you do a water change.

ShankStripedLyretail
04-24-2015, 08:53 PM
You'll want to look at the actual problem which is nitrates and phosphates. Look at ways to increase exportation and limit adding. If you feed frozen, rinse you food first to remove alot of the phosphates that are added that way. Add a filter sock to your drain lines if you have a sump or fuge and aren't using one already. If you have filter floss of any kind anywhere in the system be sure to keep those clean at all times to prevent them from producing excess nitrates. Increase intensity of lighting on cheato and it'll grow quicker and thus remove more. Few things to look at. Once you get those figured out then the algea will be naturally eliminated by cuc and other gazers.

You might also look at your lighting. T5 and halide bulbs will start adding to the problem of algea growth as they get older and start slipping out of spectrum.

^ What he said. I've been fighting this ugly snotty cyano.

Charles told me at one of the meetings to cut back light cycle. Add more flow. And reduce feeding.

Water changes (with RODI) are your best friend. Turn off your flow, blow out your rocks and siphon your sandbed. I also greatly reduced the problem by starting my light cycle over completely (off for 24 hours, adding 1 hour a day), doing a large water change, blowing my rocks off everyday and being real picky about the foods that go in the tank (mostly rinsing them like Bush said). Trying to get my RODI unit put together so I can switch my water source. We also added another skimmer to the tank and removed the rubble from our sump, so there's only chaeto under there... gonna work on installing a filter sock rack soon.

Hope it goes away! It's ugly, but eventually will go away when you get a handle on your nutrient issues.