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labinc02
12-13-2014, 12:26 PM
I've always wondered this but never asked. In freshwater the suggested way to cycle is pour 100% pure Ammonia into the tank until you reach about 2-3 ppm, and maintain the ammonia dosing until after 24 hours after dosing your ammonia/nitrite levels are 0. This works really well for things like schooling cichlids tanks where you want to drop a bunch of fish all at once.

How come I've never seen this for saltwater, when the rock is dried out like Marco's?

Murfman
12-13-2014, 12:40 PM
Using capfulls of Ammonia is common place vs using live fish or stinky, raw shrimp, in salt water. Even easier to use Dr Tims or Microbacter to start up a tank and not have a cycle.

Just_Tim
12-13-2014, 12:41 PM
I can only speak for myself it how I've done it is to start a new tank with dry but not cleaned rock. The unclean dry rock has more than enough dead organics contained within to start the nitrification process.

labinc02
12-13-2014, 01:27 PM
I can only speak for myself it how I've done it is to start a new tank with dry but not cleaned rock. The unclean dry rock has more than enough dead organics contained within to start the nitrification process.

I've never used dry unclean rock so it's interesting to know that the bacteria still survived. The one and only time we set up, was with live rock that was just pulled out of the ocean. I had an ammonia spike of .50 ppm and did a 5% wc, and 2 days later the nitrogen cycle was done.

Just_Tim
12-13-2014, 01:30 PM
I'm sure the BB was dead but there is still an ammonia source. To start the process that's all that's needed.

Murfman
12-13-2014, 01:59 PM
I've never used dry unclean rock so it's interesting to know that the bacteria still survived. The one and only time we set up, was with live rock that was just pulled out of the ocean. I had an ammonia spike of .50 ppm and did a 5% wc, and 2 days later the nitrogen cycle was done.

Bacteria didn't survive, the organics that were on the rock were dead, causing an ammonia spike, starting the bacteria bloom.

Joe
12-13-2014, 02:17 PM
I've had good experience with Dr. Tim' nitrifying bacteria. I think Microbacter might be about as good, I just started adding some of it to help my new fake rock wall piece seed. I noticed last night my water was really clear. I fed today and tired up the sand this morning, so it doesn't look as great right now. I'm going to add some daily until I use up the bottle.